With Lazarus, once a poor man, may you have eternal rest Homily for Tuesday of the 2nd Week of Lent, Cycle 1

I preached this homily at St. Rita Parish, New Orleans, Louisiana on March 16, 2017.

The Gospel was the well known story of The Rich Man and Lazarus. When you are called home, will your soul be light because you emptied yourself out, or will you be weighed down by taking and taking until you have everything? Continue readingWith Lazarus, once a poor man, may you have eternal rest Homily for Tuesday of the 2nd Week of Lent, Cycle 1

Lives matter. So does forgiveness. Reflections on the United States in 2015 and a response to Roxane Gay in the New York Times

Note: I began writing this shortly after the attack at Emmanuel Methodist Church in Charleston, SC on June 17, 2015. Some of the specifics are now a little outdated, but I think the content as a whole remains as important now as ever. Continue readingLives matter. So does forgiveness. Reflections on the United States in 2015 and a response to Roxane Gay in the New York Times

A funeral homily for a tragedy A homily for a fictitious young lady - who exists in many people's lives

This homily requires a quick explanation. I never delivered this homily in a church, and I sincerely pray I will never have to preach one like it. This was an assignment for my homiletics class to preach a funeral homily for a seventeen year old girl who was a victim in a campus shooting. I realize that events like this actually happen in our world. Continue readingA funeral homily for a tragedy A homily for a fictitious young lady – who exists in many people’s lives

The Quest: A reflection on priesthood

Don Quixote by Pablo Picasso
Don Quixote by Pablo Picasso

I am going to offer another reflection based on The Man of La Mancha. Sorry, it’s been on the swimming mp3 player for a bit. Anyway, during the story, as the residents of the inn at which Don Quixote takes up residence as his castle, he is asked to explain his quest. In musical theatre, a request for a explication of this sort almost invariably leads to a musical number. Don Quixote is no exception; he sets out with a challenging and beautiful song that lays out his quest, his vision of his knighthood. I realize that this song was so overplayed for a time, that for many it may be trite or cliché, but I think that, if we really take a moment to dig into what it’s saying, it is both real and very challenging. Within the context of the story, in fact, it is the quest that brings Don Quixote back from his final senile stupor for a final burst of strength before he dies. Continue reading “The Quest: A reflection on priesthood”